Frequently Asked Question:

Helping dogs integrate with current family pets

Dogs are pack animals, and in most cases, enjoy the company of others of their species. Many dogs are able to cohabitate with other types of animals.

NOTE: It is important when helping pets establish a relationship that someone is always present to monitor interactions. 

Tips for helping dogs get started with other dogs:

Take lots of “pack walks”

This is especially important on initial introduction when you are bringing your new dog home. Meetings and activities early on in neutral areas are helpful for first meetings and welcoming. Physical and structured exercise is a key activity in establishing a healthy routine for your dog. This is crucial to a dog both physically and mentally. Walking as a group can help further the bond between dogs as well as the humans that provide this activity.

Always keep food (and bones) separate

Dogs have an instinctual habit to guard their most basic resource from other animals – food. It is always imperative to respect your animal’s need for this. All animals’ food in your home should be separate so that your dog understands there is no need to protect or guard their meals from other animals. Although it is less common for dogs to protect resources from humans it is always beneficial to teach children as well as for adults alike to respect an animals’ needs and space while eating.

Toys, and beds can be resources too

Although it is less common, some dogs may have a need to be possessive of toys or certain other belongings in the home. It is most common that the established dog would claim these as their own toward the new addition to the family. If you experience guarding of any items in the home it is best to remove the items until a later time that the dogs have built a more solid relationship, routine and foundation. If you are unsure, it is always best to remove these items initially.

Provide separate spaces and outlets

Your newest addition needs a space to retreat and decompress from the wide variety of changes and activities they are undergoing. Your current dog will likely need this time as well, as they adjust to a new member of the home and change of dynamic. Providing separate crate and down time in addition to separate training and outing time is just as important as bonding time. Your newest friend will likely need a good deal of attention and training to get settled but make sure your current dog receives ample special attention too to prevent frustration and jealousy. 

Do not leave your new dog unattended

A dog new to an environment adjusting to a multi-pet or family member home should never be left unattended without the supervision of an adult. Your new dog lacks understanding of their new routine, rules and boundaries. Crate training is always a helpful technique if your new dog must be left alone. Do not leave a dog that is not bonded with the other pets in your home for any amount of time.

Be present

When integrating dogs in a new environment with others, an adult should always be present. A dog new to any situation should never be left unattended with another dog, a child or in an unfamiliar area. Being present requires that this adult remain aware and attentive (phone down, computer/tv off etc.). 

Tips for helping dogs get started with a cat:

Meet on leash

It is always helpful if you are unsure how your new dog and cat will react to one other if you manage the first meeting on leash. This will give you peace of mind that you have control of the initial meeting, and your dog an understanding that they cannot and should not chase. Your cat is then free to react and leave the area if they feel necessary.

Provide your cat their own “safe” space

Your cat should have their own space where they do not have to interact with a dog when desired. This space should contain their food (which is in most cases unhealthy for a dog’s consumption), their litter setup, and a space to sleep and rest apart from their canine housemates. Setting your new dog and cat up for success with the use of baby gates, cat doors, and other forms of barriers from this allotted cat space are some of the most efficient options.

Do not leave your new dog unattended

A dog new to an environment adjusting to a multi-pet or family member home should never be left unattended without the supervision of an adult. Your new dog lacks understanding of their new routine, rules and boundaries. Crate training is always a helpful technique if your new dog must be left alone. Do not leave a dog that is not bonded with the other pets in your home for any amount of time.

Other small animals:

As a result of a dog’s natural prey and chase drive – all other small animals of any kind should remain diligently separate. This includes birds and other fowl, rabbits. guinea pigs, other small rodents, and reptiles. If your family possesses small animals of this kind it is important to have a proper setup and family plan in place to ensure the safety of these current pets.

Host a Dog Sleepover

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Find out more about our Sleepover program.

Step 2 Pick a Date

Sign up for each time you'd like to have a Sleepover guest.

Step 3 Pick them up

Pick up your sleepover guest, and find fun things to do!

Step 4 Bring them back

It is tough to let them go, but maybe they'll become a permanent member of your home!

Foster a Dog

Step 1 Understand what it takes

Fostering isn't for everyone. Could it be a good fit for you?

Step 2
Apply to become a foster

Show your interest and let us get the process started

Step 3 Attend a Foster Orientation

Pick a session from the calendar to find out more about the program.

Step 4
Accept an Assignment

Taking them home is just the beginning. Your pup will need lots of patience and TLC!

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Happy Tails

Stories shared by happy adopters

Step 1 Understand the responsibility

Make sure you understand how adopting a new pet will impact your life.

Step 2
Apply to adopt

Start the formal process that will get you an appointment to meet available dogs.

Step 3 Take them home

Once we all agree you've found your new pet, pay the adoption fee and take them home (after stopping at the Supply Co)!

Step 4
Love them!

Taking them home is just the beginning. Your pup will need lots of patience and TLC!

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Saving Grace Cottage A great place to stay!

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Saving Grace Wake Forest

aka “The Funny Farm”
13400 Old Creedmoor Rd,
Wake Forest, NC 27587, USA

Saving Grace Robeson County

273 Kenric Dr.
Lumberton, NC 28360, USA

Saving Grace Wake Forest

13400 Old Creedmoor Rd
Wake Forest, NC 27587, USA

Saving Grace - Robeson

273 Kenric Dr.
Lumberton, NC 28360, USA

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